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Raul Castro

El general Raúl Castro recibió el martes al ministro de Relaciones Exteriores de Bolivia, Fernando Huanacuni Mamani, quien realiza una visita oficial a Cuba y ya se reunió con Bruno Rodríguez Parrilla.

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‘Dame la lista ahora mismo para soltarlos’, dijo el general Raúl Castro Continue reading
Why liberals should support Trump — not Obama — on Cuba policy
BY MIKE GONZALEZ, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR - 06/27/17 11:00 AM EDT 54

Was President Obama's opening to the Castro government motivated by a
real belief that it would help Cubans, or was it a vanity project from
the start? We will never know for sure, but we do know it violated his
Inaugural promise that he would shake the hands of tyrants only if they
first unclenched their fists.

Raul Castro has never relaxed his grip on the island he and his brother
have ruled for nearly 60 years. In fact, after Obama announced the
re-establishment of relations with in December 2014, he tightened it.
Since then, Cuban dissidents have paid a heavy price in repression,
arrests and beatings.

According to the Cuban Commission on Human Rights and Reconciliation,
politically motivated arbitrary arrests rose rapidly after the opening,
culminating in 9,940 last year—a six-year high. In December alone, 14
dissidents were beaten by government officials, according to the
Havana-based Commission, whose numbers are reported by Amnesty
International.

President Obama argued that, by "normalizing" relations with Cuba, the
regime would be inspired to grant fundamental freedoms to its people.
Yet Obama asked for, and of course received, nothing in return from the
Cuban authorities.

President Trump put some of that right yesterday when he announced that
he would reverse some of the Obama changes and reinstate some
prohibitions on trade with military-controlled entities and persons on
the communist-ruled island.

Trump's changes don't go far enough. Still, his critics should resist
the urge to lash out at him.

Once upon a time, American liberals knew that legitimizing dictators
never ended well for those who dared speak their minds. That insight led
them to denounce Washington's support for dictators and call out the
moral hollowness in FDR's fatuous line that Anastasio Somoza Sr. may
have been an S.O.B., "but he's our S.O.B."

They should not be surprised today that the Washington establishment's
rush to embrace the Castro regime in pursuit increased trade would only
further entrench the family's hold on power. The Obama changes, which
facilitated American trade and transfer of convertible currency to the
military and the Castro family, only made easier the prospect of their
continued rule.

In other words, if you denounced the Somozas, Augusto Pinochet and
Ferdinand Marcos, and you want to be considered consistent, you should
support the changes Trump announced in Miami.

Those changes are, in fact, narrowly tailored to restrict the
aggrandizement of the regime's military. And they didn't come easy.

Two factions waged a tremendous struggle to win President Trump's heart
and mind on the issue. On one side were a phalanx of congressional
offices that sought to curb the Cuban military's access to convertible
currency. Opposing them were career officials burrowed inside the
Treasury and the State Departments, who wanted President Obama's
legacy—the "historic opening" to the Castros—to be left untouched.

Nor was Cuba an idle bystander in the debate. According to Marc Caputo
at Politico, the regime launched a last-minute bid to stave off the
changes, enlisting Colombia's help in lobbying Trump. The government of
President Juan Manuel Santos reportedly threatened to pull out of a
U.S.-led summit on security in Latin America.

Sen. Marco Rubio, (R-Fla.), told the White House to tell Colombia that
if it withdrew from the summit, it could kiss the $450 million "Peace
Colombia" aid package goodbye. And that was that.

In the end, the Trump Cuba change closely mirrored the 2015 Cuban
Military Transparency Act introduced by Rubio in the Senate and by Devin
Nunes, (R– Calif.), in the House. The bill prohibits U.S. persons and
companies "from engaging in financial transactions with or transfers of
funds to" the Ministry of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Cuba, the
Ministry of the Interior, any of their subdivisions and companies and
other entities owned by them.

In other words, it aims directly at Cuba's largest company, the Grupo
Gaesa holding company (Grupo de Administracion Empresarial, Sociedad
Anonima). Founded by Raul Castro in the 1990s, Gaesa is run by the
military, more specifically, by Gen. Luis Alberto Rodriguez
Lopez-Callejas—who also happens to be Castro's son-in-law. It represents
an estimated 80 percent of the island nation's economy.

Its affiliate, Gaviota, SA., owns the tourism industry. If you eat ropa
vieja at a restaurant, sip a mojito in bar, play golf in a resort, or
sleep in a hotel—you are paying Gaviota. Same with renting a taxi or
renting a car. Thanks to Trump's changes, that cash flow will now be
interrupted.

Or Raul Castro can unclench his fist and allow real Cubans to own and
run these places, and we really have President Obama's dream, expressed
on a January 14, 2011 speech, of increasing "people-to-people contact;
support civil society in Cuba; enhance the free flow of information to,
from, and among the Cuban people; and help promote their independence
form the Cuban authorities."

Shouldn't liberals support this?

Mike Gonzalez (@Gundisalvus) is a senior fellow in the Kathryn and
Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy
Studies at the conservative Heritage Foundation.

The views expressed by contributors are their own and are not the views
of The Hill.

Source: Why liberals should support Trump — not Obama — on Cuba policy |
TheHill -
http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/international-affairs/339637-why-liberals-should-support-trump-not-obama-on-cuba Continue reading
Cuba should return its terrorists to US, terror victim's son says
By Eric Shawn Published June 26, 2017 Fox News

They sought safety on the shores of Cuba from American justice.

Now Joe Connor wants them back.

"Get these guys back, as a starting point for any further opening up of
Cuba," Connor insists.

An estimated 70 fugitives, including terrorists, murderers, bank robbers
and hijackers, sought refuge in Cuba and remain protected to this day by
the government. The notorious F.A.L.N. Puerto Rican terrorist group bomb
maker Willie Morales, and convicted New Jersey State Trooper killer
Joanne Chesimard, are among the most infamous who have enjoyed the
benefits of decades of Cuban protection and generosity.

Connor, whose father was killed in a New York City F.A.L.N. terrorist
bombing, says President Trump needs to add the return of the fugitives
to any new agreement with the President Raul Castro's regime.

Morales, whose hands were blown off when a bomb accidently exploded,
escaped from jail and found haven in Cuba in 1988. He is on the F.B.I.'s
Most Wanted List and charged with "Unlawful flight to avoid
prosecution/escape."

Joanne Chesimard, a member of the extremist Black Liberation Army, was
convicted of murder in 1977 and received political asylum in Cuba in
1984. She is also on the F.B.I's Most Wanted Terrorist List, wanted
for "act of terrorism, domestic terrorism and unlawful flight to avoid
confinement/murder."

Joe's father, Frank, was killed in the terrorist bombing of Fraunces
Tavern, the historic restaurant and museum in Lower Manhattan that
served as a headquarters for George Washington and where on December
4th,1783, he bid farewell to his troops. The attack, carried out by the
F.A.L.N., killed four people and wounded 44 on January 24, 1975. Frank
Connor was only 33 years old, Joe was 9. The attack was one of more than
100 bombings in the United States that the F.A.L.N. claimed
responsibility for during a wave of terror in the 1970s and 80s. Connor
has since dedicated his life to fighting for justice for his father and
other victims of terrorism.

When President Trump announced the rolling back of some of his
predecessor's Cuban policies on June 16th, he called on the Castro
regime to return the fugitives.

"To the Cuban government, I say, put an end to the abuse of dissidents,
release the political prisoners, stop jailing innocent people, open
yourselves to political and economic freedoms, return the fugitives from
American justice, including the return of the cop killer Joanne Chesimard."

Connor says he is "encouraged" by the president naming Chesimard and
raising the issue, but says: "I wish he would mention Morales' name, he
is no less a terrorist than Chesimard."

When President Obama announced the new U.S. Cuban policy in 2014, and
restored diplomatic ties with the hardline Communist island nation, the
State Department said that it would "discuss" the issue of the fugitives
with the Castro government. But the status of the wanted criminals was
not made a part of the agreement, which Connor says is a glaring and
insulting oversight.

"It was a capitulation by the Obama administration, they didn't get
anything in return," Connor said. "As a matter of fact, they took Cuba
off the state sponsor of terror list, and that is one of the points I
think Mr. Trump needs to add Cuba back to the state sponsor of terror
list, because clearly they are sponsoring terrorists by having them in
their country and that would be a big economic hit to Cuba."

Connor said that he doesn't think officials in the Obama administration
"were trying to get them back, I don't think they had any intention of
getting them back. The only way to get people back is having leverage.
Obama gave away all of our leverage."

He said the U.S. now has leverage, and can correct the oversight that
has left several dozens of wanted criminals living without consequence,
just 90 miles from our shores.


Follow Eric Shawn on Twitter: @EricShawnTV

Source: Cuba should return its terrorists to US, terror victim's son
says | Fox News -
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/06/26/cuba-should-return-its-terrorists-to-us-terror-victims-son-says.html Continue reading
El mensaje del presidente de Francia es antifascista y anticomunista Continue reading
Alabama wondering what about Cuba trade in Trump era
BY MARY SELL
Decatur Daily

MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Agriculture officials and industry leaders in Alabama for years have
lobbied for expanded exports to communist Cuba, a country they see as a
promising market for this state's poultry products.

Now they're waiting to see what President Donald Trump's recent, more
restrictive policy change with Cuba will mean for the millions of tons
of poultry that leave Mobile for the island nation every month.

Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan last week said exports to
Cuba could be impacted by that country's response to the president's
directive.

"Particularly, with Raul Castro stepping down in early '18," McMillan
said. "We're going to be anxious to see what the Cuban government's
policy is going to be.

". If something undesirable happens there, that would be on the Cuba
side," he said. "We hope that doesn't happen."

Earlier this month, Trump said the United States would impose new limits
on U.S. travelers to the island and ban any payments to the
military-linked conglomerate that controls much of the island's tourism
industry, The Associated Press reported. Trump also declared that: "The
harboring of criminals and fugitives will end. You have no choice. It
will end."

He said the United States would consider lifting those and other
restrictions only after Cuba returned fugitives and made a series of
other internal changes, including freeing political prisoners, allowing
freedom of assembly and holding free elections.

Cuba's foreign minister later rejected the policy change, saying "we
will never negotiate under pressure or under threat" and would refuse
the return of U.S. fugitives who have received asylum in Cuba.

About 7 million tons of poultry are shipped from the Port of Mobile each
month to Cuba. But Cuba has other options for importing agriculture
products, McMillan said, including Mexico, South America and Canada.

"They have choices. Some of those choices may be more expensive. That
may be our advantage," said McMillan, who has taken multiple trips to
Cuba and advocated for expanded agriculture exports.

There are human rights violations in China, but no one is cuttings off
trade there, McMillan said. "The bottom line, I think, is that the best
way to foment change down there is to continue trade with them."

Armando de Quesada, of Hartselle, disagrees. He was 10 when he fled Cuba
in 1962. On this issue, he agrees with Trump.

"Any dollars that go to Cuba automatically go to the Castro regime," de
Quesada said. "It's not like here . over there, the government owns
everything. There's no benefit to the Cuban people."

Growth of private industry is limited, and de Quesada doesn't think
opening relations between the two countries will effect change.

"I don't think enriching them helps the cause of freedom," he said. "It
doesn't help the people."

Agriculture shipments to Cuba weren't part of former President Barack
Obama's policy with the communist country. In 2000, Congress began
allowing a limited amount of agriculture exports to Cuba.

"We've been trading with them for some time," said Johnny Adams,
executive director of the Alabama Poultry and Egg Association. While
Obama made it easier, it's still cumbersome.

"We're not allowed to give them credit. They have to pay us up front
through a third party," Adams said. "Normalizing trade would make it a
lot easier."

Like McMillan, Adams has been to Cuba multiple times.

"We have the highest quality, most reasonably priced poultry in the
world, and we're 90 miles away," Adams said.

"Hopefully, everyone can sit down and work things out between the two
countries. We've enjoyed our relationship with the Cuban people and
would like to see it get better."

Source: Alabama wondering what about Cuba trade in Trump era | News &
Observer - http://www.newsobserver.com/news/business/article158213579.html Continue reading
Cuba and the United States Return to the Trenches / Iván García

Iván García, 19 June 2017 — For both countries it amounts to a remake of
the Cold War, this time in version 2.0. It will take time to determine
the scope of the contest or if the new diplomatic battle will involve
only bluffs, idle threats and blank bullets.

With an unpredictable buffoon like Donald Trump and a conspiratorial
autocrat like Raul Castro, anything could happen.

The dispute between Cuba and the United States is like an old love
story, one peppered with resentments, disagreements and open admiration
for the latter's opportunities and consumerist lifestyle.

Beginning in January 1959, the dispute between Havana and Washington
took on an ideological tone when a bearded Fidel Castro opted for
communism right under Uncle Sam's nose. The country allied itself with
the former Soviet Union and had the political audacity to confiscate the
properties of U.S. companies and to aim nuclear weapons at Miami and New
York.

Successive American administrations, from Eisenhower to George Bush Jr.,
responded with an embargo, international isolation and subversion in an
attempt to overthrow the Castro dictatorship.

Times changed but objectives remained the same. Castro's Cuba, ruled by
a totalitarian regime which does not respect human rights and represses
those who think differently, is not the kind of partner with which the
White House likes to do business.

But the art of politics allows for double standards. For various
reasons, Persian Gulf monarchies and Asian countries such as China and
Vietnam — countries which have leap-frogged over democracy like Olympic
athletes and are also heavy-handed in their use of power — are allies of
the United States or have been granted most favored nation status by the
U.S. Congress.

To the United States, Cuba — a capricious and arrogant dictatorship
inflicting harm on universally held values — is different. Washington is
correct in theory but not in its solution.

Fifty-five years of diplomatic, economic and financial warfare combined
with a more or less subtle form of subversion, support for dissidents,
the free flow of information, private businesses and an internet free of
censorship have not produced results.

The communist regime is still in place. What to do? Remain politically
blind and declare war on an impoverished neighbor or to try to coexist
peacefully?

Washington's biggest problem is that there is no effective mechanism for
overturning dictatorial or hostile governments by remote control. The
White House repeatedly shoots itself in the foot.

The embargo is more effective as a publicity tool for the Castro regime
than it is for the United States. This is because the military junta,
which controls 90% of the island's economy, can still trade with the
rest of the world.

The very global nature of modern economies limits the effectiveness of a
total embargo. In the case of Cuba, the embargo has more holes in it
than a block of Swiss cheese. Hard currency stores on the island sell
"Made in the USA" household appliances, American cigarettes and the
ubiquitous Coca Cola.

There are those who have advocated taking a hard line when it comes to
the Cuban regime. In practice, their theories have not proved effective,
though they would argue that Obama's approach has not worked either.

They have a point. The nature of a dictatorship is such that it is not
going to collapse when faced with a Trojan Horse. But as its leaders
start to panic, doubts begin to set in among party officials as support
grows among a large segment of the population. And what is most
important for American interests is to win further approval from the
international community for its geopolitical management.

Obama's speech in Havana, in which he spoke of democratic values while
directly addressing a group of wrinkled Caribbean strongmen, was more
effective than a neutron bomb.

There are many Cubans who recognize that the root of their problems —
from a disastrous economy to socialized poverty, daily shortages and a
future without hope — lies in the Palace of the Revolution.

Hitting the dictatorship in its pocketbook has not worked. In Cuba, as
Trump knows all too well, every business and corporation which deals in
hard currency belongs to the government.

And all the money that comes into the country in the form of remittances
ends up, in one form or another, in the state treasury. Sanctions only
affect the people. I am convinced that, if Cuba's autocrats lack for
anything, it is more digits in their secret bank accounts.

Like other politicians and some members of Congress, Donald Trump is
only looking at the Cuban landscape superficially.

The United States can spend millions to support Cuban dissidents (though
96% of the money goes to anti-Castro organizations based in Florida),
launch international campaigns and impose million-dollar fines on
various foreign banks to punish them for doing business with the
Caribbean dictatorship, but they overlook one thing: the regime's
opponents — local figures who would presumably be leaders of any
prolonged, peaceful battle for democracy on the island — are failing.

The reasons vary. They range from intense repression to the opposition's
proverbial inability to turn out even five-hundred people for a rally in
a public square.

I understand the frustration of my compatriots in the diaspora. I too
have suffered. I have
not seen my mother, my sister or my niece in the fourteen years since
the Black Spring in 2003 forced them to leave for Switzerland.

Various strategies have been tried yet the island's autocrats still have
not given up. They are not going to change of their own free will. They
will retreat to the trenches, their natural habitat, where they can
maneuver more easily. And they will have the perfect pretext for
portraying themselves as victims.

As is already well known, the real blockade is the one the government
imposes on its citizens through laws and regulations that hinder them
from accumulating capital, accessing foreign sources of credit and
importing goods legally.

The regime has created anachronistic obstacles to the free importation
of goods from abroad by imposing absurd tariffs and restrictions.

But Cubans want a real democracy, not a caricature. We have to
understand that we must find the solutions to our problems ourselves.

Cuba is a matter for Cubans, wherever they happen to reside. All that's
lacking is for we ourselves to believe it.

Source: Cuba and the United States Return to the Trenches / Iván García
– Translating Cuba -
http://translatingcuba.com/cuba-and-the-united-states-return-to-the-trenches-ivn-garca/ Continue reading
Cuba policy change: Poultry exports could be impacted
By Mary Sell Montgomery Bureau Jun 25, 2017

MONTGOMERY – Agriculture officials and industry leaders in Alabama for
years have lobbied for expanded exports to socialist Cuba, a country
where they see a promising market for the state's poultry products.

Now they're waiting to see what President Donald Trump's recent, more
restrictive policy change with Cuba will mean for the millions of tons
of poultry that leave Mobile for the island nation every month.

Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan last week said exports to
Cuba could be impacted by that country's response to the president's
directive.

"Particularly, with Raul Castro stepping down in early '18," McMillan
said. "We're going to be anxious to see what the Cuban government's
policy is going to be.

"If something undesirable happens there, that would be on the Cuba
side," he said. "We hope that doesn't happen."

Earlier this month, Trump said the U.S. would impose new limits on U.S.
travelers to the island, and ban any payments to the military-linked
conglomerate that controls much of the island's tourism industry, the
Associated Press reported.

Trump also declared "the harboring of criminals and fugitives will end.
You have no choice. It will end."

He said the U.S. would consider lifting those and other restrictions
only after Cuba returned fugitives and made a series of other internal
changes, including freeing political prisoners, allowing freedom of
assembly, and holding free elections.

Cuba's foreign minister later rejected the policy change, saying, "We
will never negotiate under pressure or under threat." He also said Cuba
refuses to return U.S. fugitives who have received asylum in Cuba.

About 7 million tons of poultry are shipped from the Port of Mobile each
month to Cuba. But Cuba has other options for importing agriculture
products, McMillan said, including Mexico, South America and Canada.

"They have choices. Some of those choices may be more expensive, that
may be our advantage," said McMillan, who has taken multiple trips to
Cuba and advocated for expanded agriculture exports.

There are human rights violations in China, but no one is cutting off
trade there, McMillan said.

"The bottom line, I think, is that the best way to format change down
there is to continue trade with them," he said.

Armando de Quesada of Hartselle disagrees. He was 10 when he fled Cuba
in 1962. On this issue, he agrees with Trump.

"Any dollars that go to Cuba automatically go to the Castro regime,"
Quesada said. "It's not like here. Over there, the government owns
everything. There's no benefit to the Cuban people."

Growth of private industry is limited, and Quesada doesn't think opening
relations between the two countries will effect change.

"I don't think enriching them helps the cause of freedom," he said. "It
doesn't help the people."

Ag shipments to Cuba weren't part of former President Barack Obama's
policy with the socialist country. In 2000, Congress began allowing a
limited amount of agriculture exports to Cuba.

"We've been trading with them for some time," said Johnny Adams,
executive director of the Alabama Poultry and Egg Association. While
Obama made it easier, it's still cumbersome, he said.

"We're not allowed to give them credit. They have to pay us up front
through a third party," Adams said. "Normalizing trade would make it a
lot easier."

Like McMillan, Adams has been to Cuba multiple times.

"We have the highest quality, most reasonably priced poultry in the
world and we're 90 miles away," Adams said.

"Hopefully, everyone can sit down and work things out between the two
countries," Adams said. "We've enjoyed our relationship with the Cuban
people, and would like to see it get better."

Source: Cuba policy change: Poultry exports could be impacted | State
Capital | timesdaily.com -
http://www.timesdaily.com/news/state-capital/cuba-policy-change-poultry-exports-could-be-impacted/article_b5b4e281-978f-5f8c-bf8d-79e2643e2440.html Continue reading
Iván García, 19 June 2017 — For both countries it amounts to a remake of the Cold War, this time in version 2.0. It will take time to determine the scope of the contest or if the new diplomatic battle will involve only bluffs, idle threats and blank bullets. With an unpredictable buffoon like Donald … Continue reading "Cuba and the United States Return to the Trenches / Iván García" Continue reading
Por un lado Trump cierra el cerco, por el otro se derrumba el aliado venezolano Continue reading
… in power in Havana. After Obama met the Cuban leader, Raul Castro … Obama policies on Havana, calling for “a free Cuba” in his June … private entrepreneurship in Cuba, this will urge the Cuban government to finally … an American president landed in Havana to outstretch his hand to … Continue reading

La nueva política estadounidense hacia Cuba, proclamada por el presidente Trump en Miami el viernes pasado, ha suscitado críticas en numerosos medios de prensa europeos, a todo lo ancho del espectro político. Incluso algunos editorialistas poco sospechosos de filocastrismo se han sentido en la obligación de instalarse en la equidistancia moral.

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Cuba's official television aired Donald Trump's recent appearance at the Manuel Artime Theater in Miami. That makes two speeches by US presidents that Cubans on the Island have been able to watch recently.

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La televisión oficial cubana transmitió la reciente intervención de Donald Trump en el Teatro Manuel Artime de Miami. Con este, son ya dos los discursos presidenciales estadounidenses que han podido seguirse en la Isla.

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Lamento, una vez más, ser políticamente incorrecto. Parece inminente el anuncio de la fecha de la visita del rey Felipe VI a Cuba. Ya sé que el lobby de hoteleros, financieros y empresarios, con intereses en la Cuba castrista, los diplomáticos (no todos), muchos medios de comunicación españoles, debidamente aleccionados, y una opinión pública desinformada, ven con buenos ojos que el rey visite La Habana "lo más pronto posible".

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… ), meets with Cuban President Raul Castro HAVANA, Cuba (ACN) -- Cuban President Raul Castro … Ralph Gonsalves, who was in Cuba on a working visit. During … ratified his solidarity with the Cuba following the new policy announcement … and the Grenadines in Cuba. On the Cuban side, Marcelino Medina Gonzalez … Continue reading
… this week to encourage the Cuban government to purchase crops and … easing the American embargo on Cuba. But Cuban President Raul Castro’s … the Cuban government to import rice, a mainstay of the Cuban diet. America was a major importer of rice to CubaContinue reading

El general Raúl Castro recibió el lunes en La Habana al primer ministro de San Vicente y las Granadinas, Ralph Gonsalves, quien realiza una "visita de trabajo" a la Isla, señala una nota oficial publicada en el diario oficial Granma.

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14ymedio, Reinaldo Escobar, Havana, 19 June 2017 – Over the weekend the official media have repeated ad nauseam the declaration of the government in response to Donald Trump’s speech about his policy toward Cuba. The declaration’s rhetoric recalls the years before the diplomatic thaw, when political propaganda revolved around confrontation with our neighbor to the … Continue reading "Consensus and Dissent in the Face of Trump’s Cuba Policy" Continue reading
… 's policy reversal on Cuba, calling it reminiscent of the … . "The new line towards Cuba announced by US President Donald … restore ties with Cuba, promising instead to support the Cuban people against … "unshakeable solidarity with Cuba." Cuban President Raul Castro visited Russia … Continue reading
… 's policy reversal on Cuba, calling it reminiscent of the … . "The new line towards Cuba announced by US President Donald … restore ties with Cuba, promising instead to support the Cuban people against … "unshakeable solidarity with Cuba." Cuban President Raul Castro visited Russia … Continue reading
… Trump’s policy reversal on Cuba, calling it reminiscent of the … era. “The new line towards Cuba announced by US President Donald … restore ties with Cuba, promising instead to support the Cuban people against … reaffirming its “unshakeable solidarity with Cuba.” Cuban President Raul Castro visited Russia … Continue reading
… 's policy reversal on Cuba, calling it reminiscent of the … . "The new line towards Cuba announced by US President Donald … restore ties with Cuba, promising instead to support the Cuban people against … "unshakeable solidarity with Cuba." Cuban President Raul Castro visited Russia … Continue reading
… quot;The new line towards Cuba announced by US President Donald … restore ties with Cuba, promising instead to support the Cuban people against … "unshakeable solidarity with Cuba." Cuban President Raul Castro visited Russia … year. Trump clamps down on Cuba Related reading Continue reading

El general Raúl Castro recibió este sábado en el Palacio de la Revolución de La Habana al presidente de Mozambique, Filipe Jacinto Nyusi, quien realiza una visita oficial a la Isla, según reporta la oficial Agencia Cubana de Noticias (ACN).

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HAVANA – The Cuban government said on Friday that … travel and investment in Cuba. In a statement, Cuban President Raul Castro … with Cuba,” vowing to “seek a much better deal for the Cuban … that the US Embassy in Havana would remain open. Castro also … Continue reading
… of the American embassy in Havana, which was shut down in … Friday statement, the government of Cuban President Raul Castro decried the … ;new cycle of aggression” against Cuba. Cuba "is not alone,” Maduro … . Mexico also urged Washington and Havana to resolve their differences … Continue reading
Cuban people to decide whatever changes are necessary in the island. Cuba … . In an official response, the Cuban Government stresses at the same … .S. public opinion, including the Cuban emigration in that country, to … that the two countries, as Cuban President Raul Castro has repeated … Continue reading
Trump rolls back some, not all, changes in US-Cuba relations
Darlene Superville, Michael Weissenstein and Josh Lederman, Associated
Press, Associated Press • June 17, 2017

MIAMI (AP) -- Pressing "pause" on a historic detente, President Donald
Trump thrust the U.S. and Cuba back on a path toward open hostility with
a blistering denunciation of the island's communist government. He
clamped down on some commerce and travel but left intact many new
avenues President Barack Obama had opened.

The Cuban government responded by rejecting what it called Trump's
"hostile rhetoric." Still, Cuba said it is willing to continue
"respectful dialogue" with on topics of mutual interest.

Even as Trump predicted a quick end to President Raul Castro's regime,
he challenged Cuba to negotiate better agreements for Americans, Cubans
and those whose identities lie somewhere in between. Diplomatic
relations, restored only two years ago, will remain intact. But, in a
shift from Obama's approach, Trump said trade and other penalties would
stay in place until a long list of prerequisites was met.

"America has rejected the Cuban people's oppressors," Trump said Friday
in Miami's Little Havana, the cradle of Cuban-American resistance to
Castro's government. "Officially, today, they are rejected."

Declaring Obama's pact with Castro a "completely one-sided deal," Trump
said he was canceling it. In practice, however, many recent changes to
boost ties to Cuba will stay as they are. Trump cast that as a sign the
U.S. still wanted to engage with Cuba in hopes of forging "a much
stronger and better path."

In a statement released Friday evening on government-run websites and
television, Cuban President Raul Castro's administration said Trump's
speech was "loaded with hostile rhetoric that recalls the times of open
confrontation."

The lengthy statement went on to strike a conciliatory tone, saying Cuba
wants to continue negotiations with the U.S. on a variety of subjects.
"The last two years have shown that the two countries can cooperate and
coexist in a civilized way," it said.

Embassies in Havana and Washington will remain open. U.S. airlines and
cruise ships will still be allowed to serve the island 90 miles south of
Florida. The "wet foot, dry foot" policy, which once let most Cuban
migrants stay if they made it to U.S. soil but was terminated under
Obama, will remain terminated. Remittances from people in America to
Cubans won't be cut off.

But individual "people-to-people" trips by Americans to Cuba, allowed by
Obama for the first time in decades, will again be prohibited. And the
U.S. government will police other trips to ensure travelers are pursuing
a "full-time schedule of educational exchange activities."

The changes won't go into effect until new documents laying out details
are issued. Once implemented Trump's policy is expected to curtail U.S.
travel by creating a maze of rules for Americans to obey. The policy
bans most financial transactions with a yet-unreleased list of entities
associated with Cuba's military and state security, including a
conglomerate that dominates much of Cuba's economy, such as many hotels,
state-run restaurants and tour buses.

Surrounded by Florida Republican officials, the president was unabashed
about the political overtones of his election victory and Friday's
announcement:

"You went out and you voted, and here I am, like I promised."

Cheered by Cuba hardliners in both parties, Trump's new policy is
broadly opposed by U.S. businesses eager to invest in Cuba.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, typically supportive of GOP presidents,
predicted the changes would limit prospects for "positive change on the
island," while Rep. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., said Trump's policy was
"misguided" and will hurt the U.S. economically.

Trump's declaration in a crowded, sweltering auditorium was a direct
rebuke to Obama, for whom the diplomatic opening with Cuba was a central
accomplishment of his presidency.

Yet it also exposed the shortcomings in Obama's approach.

Unable to persuade Congress to lift the decades-old trade embargo, Obama
had used his power to adjust the rules that implement the embargo to
expand built-in loopholes. Obama and his aides argued that commerce and
travel between the countries, which has blossomed since he relaxed the
rules, would make his policy irreversible.

Ben Rhodes, the former deputy national security adviser who negotiated
Obama's opening with the Cubans, said it was disappointing Trump was
halting the momentum that had built but added that it could have been worse.

"This is a limitation on what we did, not a reversal of what we did,"
Rhodes said in an interview.

For Cubans, the shift risks stifling a nascent middle class that has
started to rise as Americans have flocked to the island on airlines,
patronizing thousands of private bed-and-breakfasts.

"When he's cutting back on travel, he's hurting us, the Cuban
entrepreneurs," said Camilo Diaz, a 44-year-old waiter in a restaurant
in Havana. "We're the ones who are hurt."

Granma, the official organ of Cuba's Communist Party, described Trump's
declarations in real-time blog coverage Friday as "a return to
imperialist rhetoric and unilateral demands." Cuba's government may not
formally respond to Trump's speech until a speech Monday by its foreign
minister.

The Castro government is certain to reject Trump's list of demands,
which includes releasing political prisoners, halting what the U.S. says
is abuse of dissidents and allowing greater freedom of expression.
Refusing to negotiate domestic reforms in exchange for U.S. concessions
is perhaps the most fundamental plank of Cuba's policy toward the U.S.

Cuba functioned as a virtual U.S. colony for much of the 20th century,
and even reform-minded Cubans are highly sensitive to perceived U.S.
infringements on national sovereignty. Trump, on the other hand,
described his move as an effort to bring about a "free Cuba" after more
than half a century of communism.

"I do believe that end is in the very near future," he said.

Cuba's 1,470-word statement Friday night labeled Trump a hypocrite for
calling on Cuba to improve human rights, saying the U.S. government "is
threatening more limits on health care that would leave 23 million
people without insurance ... and marginalizes immigrants and refugees,
particular those from Islamic countries."

The statement reiterates Cuba's commitment to "the necessary changes
that we're making now as part of the updating of our socio-economic
model," but says "they will continue being decided in a sovereign way by
the Cuban people."

The U.S. severed ties with Cuba in 1961 after Fidel Castro's revolution,
and spent decades trying to either overthrow the government or isolate
the island, including by toughening an economic embargo first imposed by
President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Obama announced in December 2014 that he and Castro were restoring ties.
Less than a year later, the U.S. Embassy in Havana re-opened, and Obama
paid a historic visit to Havana in 2016.

___

Weissenstein reported from Havana and Lederman from Washington.

Source: Trump rolls back some, not all, changes in US-Cuba relations -
https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-rolls-back-not-changes-us-cuba-relations-073828473--politics.html Continue reading
Cuba Says President Trump's Speech Was 'Loaded With Hostile Rhetoric'
Associated Press
8:39 AM ET

(WASHINGTON) — The Cuban government is rejecting what it calls the
"hostile rhetoric" of President Donald Trump's speech announcing a new
U.S. policy toward the island, but says it is willing to continue
"respectful dialogue" with the U.S. on topics of mutual interest.
In a statement released on government-run websites and television Friday
evening, President Raul Castro's administration says Trump's speech was
"loaded with hostile rhetoric that recalls the times of open confrontation."
The lengthy statement goes on to strike a conciliatory tone, saying Cuba
wants to continue negotiations with the U.S. on a variety of subjects.
Cuba says "the last two years have shown that the two countries can
cooperate and coexist in a civilized way."
Trump announced a series of changes to the Obama-era Cuba policy and is
challenging the Cuban government to negotiate a better deal.
Trump said in a speech in Miami that the U.S. will not lift sanctions on
Cuba until it releases all political prisoners and respects the Cuban
people's right to freedom of assembly and expression.
Trump is also calling for the legalization of all political parties, and
free and internationally supervised elections.
The president says his new policy will also restrict the flow of
American dollars to the military, security and intelligence services
that are the core of the government led by Raul Castro.He has challenged
Cuba to "come to the table" to strike a deal that serves both country's
interests.

Source: Cuba Rejects Donald Trump's 'Hostile Rhetoric' | Time.com -
http://time.com/4822663/donald-trump-cuba-policy-raul-castro/ Continue reading
El mensaje de Raúl Castro a Donald Trump Continue reading
… of Cuba denounces the new measures toughening the embargo," Cuban state … Cuba. When Obama made the agreement and restored relations with the Cuban … with Cuba 1959: Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro leads a guerrilla army into Havana … and Cuban president Raul Castro took in a baseball game in CubaContinue reading
… Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro in Havana, March 21, 2016 … Square in Havana, January 2, 2017. Cuba on the brink Cuba said this … move could entrench hardliners in Havana. The Cuban government has withstood the … with Cuba unless it met certain "demands," including granting CubansContinue reading
Continue reading
14ymedio, Reinaldo Escobar, Havana, 13 June 2017 – In less than 72 hours President Donald Trump will declare in Miami the new basis for the United States government’s policies towards Cuba. At that time the decisions of his predecessor Barack Obama, during the process of normalization of diplomatic relations with the island, could be paused … Continue reading "Trump And Cuba, Or How To Bet On The Wrong Winner" Continue reading
Agazapado y a la sombra del poder desde siempre, ha demostrado ser más fuerte que el hermano Continue reading
HAVANA, Cuba, Jun 15 (ACN) The President … will arrive this Thursday in Cuba on an official visit. According … hold official talks with his Cuban counterpart, Army General Raul Castro … Continue reading
Cuba's Castro sets elections timetable

Cuba is set to hold municipal elections on October 22, a precursor to
the handover of power from President Raul Castro in 2018. Accession in
one-party systems is never easy, and Cuba is no exception.

President Castro has said he will step down next February at the end of
his second five-year term, but has indicated he will stay on as head of
the Communist Party, the only legal party in Cuba.
The date for provincial and national assembly elections will be
published "at the corresponding time," the ruling Communist Party
newspaper Granma said on Wednesday.
Municipal assembly delegates are nominated by neighbors and do not have
to belong to the Communist Party, although the path to the National
Assembly and ultimately to the presidency is controlled by the party.
Which way next?
The electoral notice coincides with a period of uncertainty for Cuba.
The group that has ruled the country since the 1959 revolution is dying
out and Cuba's main political and trade ally Venezuela is in crisis. For
the past decade, Venezuelan oil subsidies have been crucial to Cuba's
economy.

US President Donald Trump, meanwhile, is expected to announce his Cuba
policy on Friday.
Trump may roll back some of former President Barack Obama's overtures to
the island, which included the restoration of relations and the
reopening of embassies.
Castro's first vice president, the 57-year-old Miguel Diaz-Canel, is
widely tipped to assume Castro's mantle, but there is also talk of a
radical break with the older generation and an embrace of the market
reforms that have been a feature of Castro's nine-year rule.
Castro took over the presidency in 2008 from his ailing brother and
revolutionary leader Fidel Castro, who died last November. As a cautious
pragmatist, many initially felt the younger sibling was a stopgap when
he formally assumed office.

Source: Cuba′s Castro sets elections timetable | News | DW | 15.06.2017
- http://www.dw.com/en/cubas-castro-sets-elections-timetable/a-39259785 Continue reading
14ymedio, Yoani Sanchez, Havana, 12 June 2017 — His mother died, his brother emigrated and now no one brings flowers to the tomb of one of those many young Cubans who lost their lives on the African plains. His death served to build the authoritarian regime of José Eduardo dos Santos in Angola, a caudillo who, … Continue reading "The End Of The Cycle For Two Caudillos" Continue reading
La sombra de su hermano, y hasta el zodiaco chino, lo dejan en evidencia Continue reading
… provide financial support for the Cuban government but rather motivate the … providing financial support for the Cuban regime. “We think we have … diplomatic relations with Cuba, begun by Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro … provide financial support to the Cuban regime,” Tillerson said. There is … Continue reading
14ymedio, Yoani Sanchez, 6 June 2017 — The leader speaks for hours on the platform, his index finger pointing to an invisible enemy. A human tide applauds when the intonation of a phrase demands it and stares enraptured at the bearded speaker. For decades these public acts were repeated in Havana’s Plaza of the Revolution, shaping the … Continue reading "Populism Cuban Style: Conquests, Threats and Leadership" Continue reading
En medio de rumores sobre un supuesto deterioro de su estado de salud Continue reading

El saxofonista cubano Paquito D'Rivera alabó en una entrevista con EFE la "valentía" que los venezolanos muestran día a día en los calles para exigir el fin del Gobierno de Nicolás Maduro y lamentó que el pueblo cubano no haya tomado nunca el mismo camino.

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… prisoners with the Cuban government, reestablished diplomatic relations with Havana and became the first US president since 1928 to visit Cuba. In January, Cuban President Raul Castro, who … in Cuba, that will be forefront in those policy discussions." CubanContinue reading